Devotionals
Worship Service begins at 10:30 AM
Third & Adams Street, PO Box 9774, Moscow, Idaho USA | (208) 882-3715

Pastor Debbies, E-Spire - October 3, 2018

Last night, about midnight, we had a sick kiddo. I'll spare you the details, but it took about 30 minutes to clean up. Waking up to those sounds and those chores was not a welcome surprise. But, I did what needed to be done, including scrubbing floors and starting laundry, and praying no one else comes down with the same.

This morning as I switched laundry and washed contaminated items, I was struck with gratitude...not for the chores, but that there's a washer and dryer in the house so I could start something at midnight. We have fresh water to wash and fresh water for my kiddo to help her rehydrate.

As I reflected, I thought of folks who don't have fresh water or cleaners to clean up the mess. Or have to wait a day (or two or three depending on work to go to the laundry mat to start the wash), or those who have to do it all by hand, or no real access to water to wash at all. I thought of those who don't have "sick supplies" on hand and can't afford to go the grocery and get them. And then I thought of those babies (of any age) who are so sick from diseases, malnutrition, or chemo treatments that vomitting is the norm and not the exception.

In the day to day, it can be really easy to get caught up in my circumstances, frustrations, or struggles (or even my joys). As humans, it's extraordinarily easy to make things all about ourselves. But as Christians, we're called to look beyond ourselves and see others and their circumstances, to cultivate empathy for them and their story, and to take actions to make things better in the world.

Over the next month, our worship series is called "More Than Us" and is focused on how our faith pushes us to look at the world beyond us. And not just look, but pray and find ways to take action. I have been praying for those God has called to mind all morning. And now, I need to do some research for how I might do something to create greater access to clean water, or offer resources to those who are going without, or advocate for access to healthcare here and around the globe.

I hope you'll join us in worship this week and in the following weeks. And if you've been inspired to take actions and connected with agencies or groups who are changing the world for the better, I'd love to learn more!

Peace and grace,
Pastor Debbie

 

Read more devotionals...

Pastor Debbie E-Spire- - Septmber 19, 2018

Two Sundays ago we talked about Paul's letter to the Colossians, including his prayers for them. I encouraged you to identify a church for which you might be praying. What ministries are going well, for which you might give God praise? And what things are not going well that you might lift up in prayer?

Have you found a church? Have you talked to a pastor or member? Do you have specific things to lift in prayer?

I shared that my friend's church is Asheville is the one I had on my heart. I see their ministries on facebook and have lots of reasons to give thanks. I have been playing phone tag with my friend, their pastor, but know Hurricane Florence and the rains were of concern, so they've been in my prayers for that. I do look forward to hearing more about what's happening in the day to day and lifting them up.

What about you? Which church are you praying for?

In Christ,
Pastor Debbie

 

 

Read more devotionals...

Read more: Pastor Debbie E-Spire- - Septmber 19, 2018

Pastor Debbie's E-Spire - July 18, 2018

Last week I had the privilege of serving as the camp pastor at our UM camp Twinlow, just out of Rathdrum. I've done a lot of camp over the years (8 weeks as a counselor and 7 as a camp dean). It's been a few years since I've been and I really enjoyed the opportunity to be up with the kids and meet new people.

I also really enjoyed being pushed to try some new things and take some risks. You see, I'm a pretty conservative risk taker. I'm not a fan of failure, so I usually only risk when I know the odds are mostly in my favor. And physically, like with sports and things, I've never been one to push myself. But this week I was invited to try some new things and I thought, "why not?"

On one of the first days, the camp manager asked, "Do you like to swim?" Sure! I replied. "Do you want to swim across the lake?" Uhh...I guess!?! "It's about 750 yards" Uhh...ok... In the afternoon, he got out a paddle board and grabbed some goggles and offered them to me. I declined. "I can swim, but I'm not a good swimmer. I don't swim with my face in the water." And off we went. I swam the 1/2 mile across the lake. If you're a swimmer, that might not sound like much, but for me, it was the longest single distance I've ever swum in my life. And when we got to the other side he hopped off the paddle board and offered it to me so he could swim back. Which was great except 1) I've never used a paddleboard before and 2) My legs were exhausted from the swim so they just shook when I stood and tried to balance. I had a few graceless exits into the water before I decided I would just kneel and paddle. He encouraged me to get back on my feet after a little ways across the lake. I tried and failed again. And went back to kneeling. Then awhile later I tried again and got up and did pretty well until I started looking around at other things and lost my balance again. It wasn't pretty, but I was pleased, I had never done it and I tried. I didn't shy away fearing how awkward I would look or how hard it might be. I took the chance and made it.

A couple of days later they asked if I wanted to go rock jumping. Uh...sure?! And off we went. We had to climb a short ways to the ledge and then could choose to jump from 17 feet, 11 feet, 9 feet or 7 feet. I hemmed and hawed at the 17-foot ledge. I wanted to do that one, but visions of slipping and hitting my head kept swimming in my head. So I ventured to the lower ledge and took off. And it was awesome! I went up multiple times without a group and managed to get about 5 jumps in. I was never able to convince myself to do more than the 7-foot ledge, but there's always next time.

I don't share any of this to brag, but to let you know I was reminded of the importance of risk-taking and venturing outside your comfort zone. Doing new things can be tough (emotionally and physically) and you can even get some bumps and bruises (I ended up with cuts and bruises up and down both legs that are still healing). But you also get to explore, push yourself, and find a new sense of accomplishment.

I am praying God will encourage us to be a risk-taking church--to push ourselves, to take on new challenges, to risk failure, and to see new things and find a new sense of accomplishment in who we are as Christ's-followers. Will you pray with me?

 

In Christ,

Pastor Debbie

 

Read more devotionals...

Read more: Pastor Debbie's E-Spire - July 18, 2018

Pastor Debbie's E-Spire - June 30, 2018

Often times, we avoid certain topics in discussion with friends or family. We know they'll be contentious. We expect we might not like one another when we walk away, so instead, we avoid them completely. My family does it. And I'm fairly certain your families do it too. It's how we preserve relationships. But it can also be how we avoid learning other perspectives or sharing the value of our own. Delving into tough topics isn't easy. But it is often necessary. At Annual Conference this year, we heard from Dr. Brian Brown on the Anatomy of Peace, and then we were part of focus groups of 8-12 who discussed the nature of conflict, our approach to conflict, and what might be different in our lives, the life of the church, and the life of the denomination if we approached conflict with a "heart of peace" instead of a "heart of war". We live in contentious times. It's easy to get caught up in arguments or be dismissive of other perspectives. Throughout our time at Annual Conference, we were encouraged to be "curious" (e.g., "Tell me more about that") and to engage in discussion (and potential areas of conflict) with a heart of peace.

As Christians, we are called to be light-bearers, peace-builders, and justice-seekers, and we are called to do all of that with a "heart of peace" (of compassion and love for the "other").

How might you differentiate between a heart of peace and a heart of war? Where has that come easily for you lately? Where has it been challenging?

In Christ,

Pastor Debbie

 

Read more devotionals...

Read more: Pastor Debbie's E-Spire - June 30, 2018

Pastor Debbie's E-Spire - May 23, 2018

Two weeks ago I wrote to share about the Commission on the Way Forward and the decision of the Council of Bishops. I also mentioned that there had been other news about the Constitutional Amendments, but that it would require it's own email.

Today I am writing to that end. I will say it has been both emotional and confusing as people found out the vote on the amendments, responded to that vote and then found out there had been a change in language prior to the annual conference votes requiring that there would be a re-vote this year.

As I said in the last e-spire, the General Conference is the only body that is allowed to change church law. For changes to the constitution of the UMC, the General Conference must have 2/3 vote and then each individual annual conference has to have a 2/3 vote in order for the constitutional amendment to be ratified. In 2016, there were 5 constitutional amendments proposed and passed. In 2017, each annual conference was presented information on each amendment and then allowed to vote for or against the changes. Then, all of the vote tallies were compiled and the final data was delivered to the Council of Bishops at their meeting in early May of 2018.

Amendments 3, 4, and 5 passed. Amendments 1 and 2 did not. For a general article about the amendments, please click here.

Amendments 1 & 2 dealt with gender equality and their failure to pass was met with a lot of hurt and anxiety, especially by women about their role and value in the church as a whole. To read a response from the female bishops, please click here.

The female bishops summarize the amendments in this way:

Amendment #1, which added language that both men and women are made in the image of God and that we will confront and seek to eliminate discrimination against women and girls, received an aggregate vote of 66.5%, falling short of the necessary 2/3 majority by .2 % (less than 100 votes).

Amendment #2, which added this language, "... nor shall any member be denied access to an equal place in the life, worship, and governance of the Church because of race, color, gender, national origin, ability, age, marital status, or economic condition," received an aggregate vote of 61.3%, again falling short of a 2/3 vote.

The complete language is found in the Bishop's response. Since the release of the information there has been much discussion about why these amendments failed (especially in a denomination that has affirmed women since the beginning and has been ordaining women for over 60 years. When asked, some annual conferences shared that the amendments did not go far enough in changing the level of inclusion, and others shared that other pieces of the amendment were not agreeable. Through all of the discussions, it was discovered that the actual amendment language had been changed before it made it to the annual conferences, so there will be a re-vote this year at each annual conference. For more information on the specifics, please click here.

I offer this to you as information of what is happening in the denomination and for reference for what some of you may see or hear or read from Methodist friends or family.

At the end of it all I hope you will know these things:

1) Change in the church is possible, and often slow, but it is thorough and thoughtful.

2) I do affirm the place of women and girls in our church and around the globe and believe it is our job to ensure equality in treatment and opportunities regardless of gender.

3) As always, if you have questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me.

 

In Christ

Pastor Debbie

 

p.s. after reading yesterday's e-spire, some asked for the original language of each of the amendments. To find that, you can click here.

Have a blessed day!

 

Read more devotionals...

Current Church News

  • FUMC Auction & Dinner - Friday, October 19th

    The first Missions Auction and Dinner was so fun, we are going to do it again! Mark you calendars for Friday, October 19th at the Latah County Fair grounds. Like last year we will be serving dinner and having a silent and live auction. The Missions Auction helps support local nonprofits, including: Family Promise, Sojourner’s Alliance, My Little Pantry, Alternatives to Violence and more. All money raised at this event goes to mission projects with no overhead or fees taken out. Please help support our neighbors and friends in need. Tickets on sale soon!

Get Directions

Sunday morning parking at the church is available in the high school parking lot on Third Street across from the church and in the city lots west of the church. These lots are available only on Sunday mornings. A small lot for handicapped parking is available just off of Adams Street on the north side of the church, with an accessible entrance directly into the sanctuary. A lift operates between the Fellowship Hall (3rd Street level) and the Sanctuary . William Sound System Receivers and Headsets are available to assist with hearing problems.

Church Mission

The First United Methodist Church of Moscow, Idaho takes as our mission to be the body of Jesus Christ, ministering to a community which draws strength from its diversity. Our mission centers on the worship of God, expressed through varied forms of prayer, preaching, music, and ritual.  See more...